by Debra Williams

We at Celebrations would like to think that every drop of our delicious wines is drank by you, our wonderful customers. We do understand, however, that sometimes, perhaps after a night of libations and merriment, one of our bottles may be left out overnight uncorked.

Should that happen, I thought I would provide you with an alternative, but delicious sounding use for that left over bottle of wine. I’ve not tried it yet, but plan to, as we sometimes have leftover wine after a tasting.

Chef John Currence has a touching article on HGTV about his late mother and his attempt to make use of her wine collection that had been “damaged” a little during the hurricane in New Orleans. Some of the wine had floated for days in the flooding and lost their labels. All the wine, mostly burgundies, had been left for days in the insufferable heat that followed Hurricane Katrina.

After her death last year, Chef Currence came up with a way to turn her wine into vinegar. Author Allie Holcomb King writes that it is a simple process of letting the alcohol, through natural processes, convert into acetic acid by using naturally occurring bacteria.

Chef John Currence is a chef based in Oxford, Mississippi. He plans to use the vinegar in his four restaurants , which are also located in Oxford.

What a wonderful way to share his mother’s passion for wine and her life with his customers and ultimately with us.

His recipe is as follows:

Ingredients
2-gallon glass, ceramic or stainless steel
container
2 quarts red or white wine
1 cup live, unfiltered vinegar
Strainer
Two small bottles

Here’s the easy, peasy part. Pour your leftover wine into your container, note specific types above, and add the one cup live, unfiltered vinegar. Cover the top of the container with a cloth, and place in a warm, dark place. Allow to stand for two months. Strain and the pour the vinegar into the two small bottles, allow it to then sit for another two months.

Let me know through email or Facebook if you try the above recipe. I’d love to hear how it turned out and how you used it in a recipe. I’ll find a way to incorporate mine into a recipe and include in our newsletter.

Thank you Chef Currence!